CargoSurveyor: a complete toolbox on the iPhone for marine cargo surveyors, bunker surveyors and expeditors

We are proud to finally introduce our latest iPhone app – CargoSurveyor: a comprehensive set of tools for marine cargo surveyors, bunker surveyors, expeditors and chief officers on crude/product/chemical tankers.

After two years of development and intensive testing we have now released CargoSurveyor Tools!

CargoSurveyor contains everything you need to carry out a complete cargo survey on oil and chemical tankers, and is designed with the aim to do all required tasks without laptop and hard copy tables.

download in the appstore   CargoSurveyor can be downloaded here.

This post serves as a brief introduction to the app, a detailed tutorial and a comprehensive manual will be published as soon as possible. A reasonably detailed presentation with lots of screenshots can be downloaded on slideshare.

The toolbox contains (amongst others) the following items:

1: Fully configurable ullage form:

The user can choose the number of tanks, from a minimum set of 5 wing tanks plus two slop tanks, to a maximum set of 7 crosses plus two slop tanks, as well as three bottom lines:

Configure number of tanks

Configure number of tanks

Regardless of the program’s main settings, ullages /temperatures/densities/volumes can be entered in either SI Metric or Imperial units. In the same report both Metric and Imperial units can be mixed, the app will automatically convert to the right units during processing.

When the time comes to save/print or email the report, the user can choose whether to use SI Metric or Imperial units, regardless of which units have been used during the creation of the report. An unlimited number of ullage reports can be saved, and existing reports can be cloned in order to create different reports for the same ship (i.e before and after discharging etc).

The report can be send as an email attachment from within the app, and can also be saved as a png file to the camera roll. If required, the png file can then be transferred to a desktop computer for printing.

2: Fully configurable time sheet editor:

The time sheet editor comes with a whole bunch of standard entries but has ample room for new entries as required by the user. Events can be entered into the editor in any order, the app will automatically sort all entries by date and time. An unlimited number of time sheets can be saved, one for each ship and/or event as desired. Like the ullage report, the time sheet can be send as an email attachment from within the app, and can be saved to the camera roll for transferring to a computer:

Time sheet standard entries

Time sheet standard entries

iOS Simulator Screen shot Oct 31, 2014 6.22.47 PM

Time sheet details editor

3: Configurable wedge calculator:

The app contains a wedge calculator with the following features:

    – calculate wedge volume based on ship/tank dimensions

    – calculate wedge volume based on tank calibration table volume

    – calculate wedge volume using either Metric or Imperial units

Entries made are automatically saved and restored the next time the user opens the wedge calculator.

Wedge volume using tank dimensions

Wedge volume using tank dimensions

Wedge volume using tank table volume

Wedge volume using tank table volume

 

 

4: Instant tank totals view per grade, or for all grades together:

After creating an ullage sheet and filling in a grade name, temperature, volume and density (or API) for each tank, the user can view the tank totals, either per grade or the grand totals. The totals screen will give the totals of observed volume, gross standard volume, metric tons etc, as well as the physical average temperature of the cargo.

List of available grades

List of available grades

Totals - Imperial units

Totals – Imperial units

Totals - Metric units

Totals – Metric units

Again regardless of what units have been used in the ullage report, the totals can be viewed in either Metric or Imperial units by choosing the desired unit in general settings.

 5: Detail view for each tank after entering data:

After entering data in the tank details editor, all data can be viewed for each tank in the first screen, using the buttons to select either a tank or a bottom line:

all details viewer

Details of tank 4P

 

Configure number of tanks

Configure number of tanks

 

Settings: in the ‘more’ screen the user has access to a settings panel, where there are options to:

general settings

 – chose ASTM tables 1980 or 2004

 – chose SI Metric or Imperial units and methods (i.e. whether to use table  6A or 54A for example)

 – chose whether to calculate metric tons in air using table 56 or using  density(vac) – 11 points

 – set the precision for vcf, gsv, metric tons etc

 Aside from all the above, the app contains a complete set of forms as  required by marine cargo surveyors:

 – Transfer summary (for vessel) and executive transfer summary (for the client)

- Pumping log

- OBQ / ROB report

- Slop report

- Reference heights and raw measurements report

- Bunker report

- VEF report

- Preloading report

- Sampling report

- Standard protest letters (such as ship/shore diff, ship fig/BL diff, in transit diff)

- Standard Statement of Facts letters (such as H2S / HC in cargo tanks, Inert Gas in tanks)

- Fully customisable Notice of Discrepancy and Statement of Facts forms

A much more detailed post will appear shortly, with a comprehensive tutorial on how to effectively use the app.

download in the appstore   In the mean time, CargoSurveyor can be downloaded here. In line with Apple’s latest development guidelines, the app runs fine on all iOS7 and iOS8 devices, both iPhones and iPads.

For more information about the app, with lots of screenshots and a concise outline of how to use most features, please see the presentation in slideshare.

An equivalent for Android is still under development and will hopefully be published sometime in January 2015, so if you are interested in that, keep watching this space for further developments, or follow this blog to be advised automatically.

Updates for OilCalcs, OilCalcsHD and Oil Calculator Pro released

Today an update was released for OilCalcs and OilCalcsHD, for the iPhone and iPad.

For Oil Calculator Pro (for Android) the same update was released a few days ago.

The update achieves the following:

- 1. Fixes a bug in table 6, 54 and 60 (1980 versions) where odd densities were sometimes rounded up to the nearest even density instead of rounded down.

- 2. Implements the special application tables 6C, 54C and 60C, 1980 version. The 2004 version of all special application tables was implemented in an earlier release.

The reason for maintaining the 1980 version for all tables is that there are quite a few countries that have not adopted the 2004 version of the ASTM tables. As per API guidelines, legally there is no obligation to adopt the latest standards, as long as all parties involved in transactions agree upon the standard to be used.

For downloads, please see the provided links here under:

 

download in the appstore   OilcalcsHD for iPad version 1.1.1 can be downloaded here.

download in the appstore   Oilcalcs for iPhone version 1.1.3 can be downloaded here.

Get it on Google Play    The latest version of Oil Calculator Pro can be downloaded here.

OilcalcsHD for iPad version 1.1.0 – Volumetric shrinkage added to blending tools

Oilcalcs HD for iPad has been updated to version 1.1.0 today, and now includes volumetric shrinkage calculations in the two fuel blending tools, just like its iPhone counterpart Oilcalcs and its Android counterpart OilCalcsPro.

As mentioned in a previous post for the Android app, both blending tools now include formulas from API MPMS Chapter 12.3 to calculate volumetric shrinkage as a result of mixing hydrocarbons.

In the new version, both blending tools include shrinkage calculation and in the “Fuel blend two components” tool the actual shrinkage is displayed in the results:

Updated blending tools with shrinkage calculation

Updated blending tools with shrinkage calculation

For more information regarding volumetric shrinkage, please refer to our post “API MPMS Ch 12.3 – Volumetric shrinkage when mixing hydro carbons” which explains the theory behind shrinkage as well as the formulas used.

The user manual for the iPad version of Oilcalcs is currently being compiled. It will be available for free download in the tab “User Manuals for oil calculators”, just like the iPhone and Android versions of the manual which are already available online.

download in the appstore   OilcalcsHD for iPad version 1.1.0 can be downloaded here.

Oilcalcs for iPhone version 1.1.2 – Volumetric shrinkage added to blending tools

Oilcalcs for iPhone has been updated to version 1.1.2 today, and now includes volumetric shrinkage calculations in the two fuel blending tools, just like its Android counterpart, OilCalcsPro.

As mentioned in a previous post for the Android app, both blending tools now include formulas from API MPMS Chapter 12.3 to calculate volumetric shrinkage as a result of mixing hydrocarbons.

Next in line for updating is OilcalcsHD, the iPad version of Oilcalcs, which will hopefully be ready towards the end of this month (end of June).

Once the update for OilcalcsHD has been released we will also publish the user manuals for the iPhone and iPad version of Oilcalcs. They will be available for free download in the tab “User Manuals for oil calculators”, just like the Android version manual which is already available online.

download in the appstore   Oilcalcs for iPhone version 1.1.2 can be downloaded here.

API MPMS Ch 12.3 – Volumetric shrinkage when mixing hydro carbons

In my previous post I promised to discuss API MPMS Chapter 12.3 – Volumetric shrinkage resulting from blending light hydrocarbons with crude oils.

As mentioned in the earlier post, whenever two hydrocarbons of different density are mixed, it can be observed that the resulting total volume is not equal to the sum of the two individual components.

Depending on the properties of the two constituents, the total volume could be either smaller, or larger than the sum of the two constituents, although generally when mixing fuel oils or fuel oil and crude oil, the tendency seems to be a positive shrinkage.

Following extensive research, API published Chapter 12.3 in 1996, as an improvement to API bulletin 2509C. Compared to bulletin 2509C the new chapter 12.3 has both a bigger density range and a larger mixing ratio range. Also the empirical formulas have been adjusted to fit a larger set of data and are consequently a lot more accurate across the full ranges.

Two formulas have been developed for calculating the shrinkage, one for SI Metric Units and one for Imperial Units:

For SI Metric Units the following formula is used:

S = 2.69 * 10^4 * C * (100 – C)^0.819 * (1/dL – 1/dH)^2.28

where

S = volumetric shrinkage as percentage of the total mixture ideal volume

C = concentration in liquid volume percent of lighter component

dL = density of light component

dH =  density of heavy component

 

For Imperial Units the following formula is used:

S = 4.86 * 10^-8 * C * (100 – C)^0.819 * G^2.28

where

S = volumetric shrinkage as percentage of the total mixture ideal volume

C = concentration in liquid volume percent of lighter component

G = difference in API gravity of light and heavy component

To give an example for both Units:

SI Metric Units:

Blend 6,000 M³ of crude with a density of 824.0 kg/M³ with 300 M³ of natural gasoline with a density of 651.0 kg/M³

The concentration C of the light component is:

     300 / (300 + 6000) = 4.76%

The shrinkage will be:

      S = 2.69 * 10^4 * 4.76 * (100 – 4.76)^0.819 * (1/651 – 1/824)^2.28 =0.0585%

Therefore the total actual volume will be:

      6,300 * (1 – 0.000585) = 6,296.31 M³

The average density of the mix will be:

      (6,000 * 824 + 300 * 651) / 6,296.31 = 816.2 kg/M³

whereas the theoretical mix density would have been:

      (6,000 * 824 + 300 * 651) / 6,300 = 815.8 kg/M³

Imperial Units:

Blend 120,000 Bbls of RMG fuel with an API gravity of 15.2° with 60,000 Bbls of crude with an API gravity of 45°

The concentration C of the light component is:

     60,000 / (60,000 + 120,000) = 33.3%

The shrinkage will be:

      S = 4.86 * 10^-8 * 33.3 * (100 – 33.3)^0.819 * (45 – 15.2) ^2.28 = 0.116%

Therefore the total actual volume will be:

      180,000 * (1 – 0.00116) = 179,791.2 Bbls

The average API gravity of the mix cannot be established simply using the two API gravities. They must be converted first to densities, and the final density can then be reconverted to API gravity.

The average density will be:

      (120,000 * 964 + 60,000 * 801.3) / 179,791.2 = 910.8

whereas the theoretical mix density would have been:

      (120,000 * 964 + 60,000 * 801.3) / 180,000 = 909.8

Consequently the average API gravity will be: 23.8 °

Whereas the theoretical API gravity would have been: 23.9 °

From the last example it is obvious that the influence of mixing with a lighter component can be considerable. In this example, a 33.3% mix resulted in a volumetric loss of 0.116%. As can be seen from the formulas, the higher the difference in API gravity or density, the higher the loss of volume.

If you would apply this to a situation where an oil tanker discharges 120,000 M³ fuel oil into shore tanks that contain 60,000 M³ of crude oil (using the API gravities from the example above), this 0.116% loss means an actual volume loss of 208 M³.

The volumetric loss is obviously compensated by the increase in density but normally in cases like this the density of the mix will be established by sample testing, meaning that a considerable loss in weight can occur depending on the outcome of the density testing.

The above calculations can all be verified on Oil Calculator Pro for Android, as well as with Oilcalcs for iPhone.

The updated version of Oilcalcs and OilcalcsHD for iPhone and iPad will also have this feature added to the blending tools, but the update has not yet been released.

We are currently working hard to push the update out to the Appstore, and will let you know once it has been released.

 

Get it on Google Play    The latest version of Oil Calculator Pro can be downloaded here.

download in the appstore   Oilcalcs for iPhone version 1.1.2 can be downloaded here.

Oil Calculator Pro for Android – volumetric shrinkage calculation added

An update has been released for Oil Calculator Pro for Android, which now is on version 1.0.4

The updated addresses several bugfixes in the quantity record editor, as well as a bug in the LPG density calculator.

Also in this update volumetric shrinkage calculation as per API MPMS Chapter 12.3 has been added to the two blending utilities.

It is a well known phenomenon when mixing hydro carbons of different density, that the total volume after mixing is not the same as the sum of the two components.

Depending on the properties of the two components the total volume can be either more or less than the sum of the two components, although when mixing fuel oils or fuel oil with crude oil, in most cases there will be a reduction in total volume rather than an increase.

API started collecting data concerning shrinkage of oil volumes as the result of mixing in the 1950s, and the first API paper that concerned itself with shrinkage and the definition of empirical formulas to calculate shrinkage, Publication 2509C, was published in 1962.

In subsequent years it became apparent that the formulas as defined in publication 2509C were not sufficient to cover the entire range of hydro carbons that are nowadays blended, and eventually API arranged for one more study to be conducted that ultimately led to the publication of API MPS Chapter 12.3 in 1996.

A separate blog post will be dedicated to a more indepth discussion of API MPMS Chapter 12.3 and its use. For now let it suffice to say that Oil Calculator Pro for Android uses the formulas as defined in  API MPMS Chapter 12.3.

It is worth noting that while many articles that discuss shrinkage, focus on the phenomenon of shrinkage when blending fuel oil with crude oil. The same principles however apply when mixing fuel oils with different densities.

Although lubrication oils are equally subject to the shrinkage phenomenon, API MPMS Chapter 12.3 does not apply to lubrication oils, and the formulas can therefore not be applied.

A study was carried out in 2011 by J. Shansool et al, titled “Volumetric behaviour of mixtures of different oil stocks”, that sheds a bit more light on the behavior of lubrication oils. The white paper is available online in this link.

Get it on Google Play    The latest version of Oil Calculator Pro can be downloaded here.

Oil Calculator Pro for Android – one more important update

On 6th May 2014 we published an update to Oil Calculator Pro for Android that fixed a variety of bugs.

Today we have released one more update, that addresses the bugs which make the app crash when using European and certain other keyboards, such as Dutch, Danish, Vietnamese and several others.

These keyboards use a comma instead of a dot for decimal numbers and because Android itself contains a bug within its localization features, it is a bit of a nightmare for us developers to swerve around the bumps in the road when it comes to dealing with localization.

The latest fix ensures that even if the user has a European keyboard and enters commas in places where the app is expecting a dot, internally the comma is replaced with a dot.

For users from the US and Asia (except Vietnam and Indonesia) there will be no visible change with this update.

All users from Europe (except UK), Indonesia and some African countries (Nigeria, Cameroon) are advised to update to version 1.0.3 as soon as possible.

 

 

Get it on Google Play